AP/Elise Amendola

Red Sox Parade Celebrates World Series Champs

Wednesday, October 31, 2018


By PHILIP MARCELO and BOB SALSBERG ,  Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) — Confetti cannons boomed and huge crowds of fans cheered wildly on Wednesday as the Boston Red Sox rumbled through downtown aboard duck boats to mark the team's fourth World Series championship in the past 15 years.

The rolling rally set off from venerable Fenway Park and wound its way through major city streets lined by fans numbering in the hundreds of thousands, some who arrived before dawn.

Bits of red, white and blue paper rained down as team officials, players, and their families waved from the amphibious, World War II-era vehicles. Some autographed balls and tossed to them from the jubilant throng.

"It's been nothing but love. We're out here having a good time. We're turnt up," said Jarrick Fidalgo, a New Bedford, Massachusetts, native.

Security was tight along the route, which took the team past the site of the deadly 2013 Boston Marathon bombings.

Throughout the day, spontaneous anti-Yankees chants rang out, a nod to the long-running rivalry between the American League squads.

Countless Boston-area youths skipped class to take in the parade.

"I heard there were six people in my history class today. Everyone is here," said Max Colognesi, a 16-year-old from nearby Chestnut Hill who joined friends near the ballpark. "I have a lot of homework when I get back, but it's worth it."

During a pre-parade ceremony at Fenway, Cora thanked fans for supporting the team as it won a team-record 108 games before beating the New York Yankees, Houston Astros and Los Angeles Dodgers in the playoffs.

"I've been saying since Day One, this is crazy, this is madness," he said.

Boston fans learned even more good news Wednesday when pitcher David Price announced before the start of the parade that he planned to stay in Boston, declining a contract option that would have enabled him to become a free agent.

On Tuesday, the team announced they were exercising their $15 million option for next season to retain another star pitcher, Chris Sale.

Though some fans were enjoying their first championship parade, many others, like 23-year-old Derek Safford, were veterans.

The North Attleborough, Massachusetts, resident and his family have attended every parade since 2004, including celebrations of titles for the New England Patriots, Boston Celtics and Boston Bruins.

"I know people had doubts at the start of the season with Cora being a first-time manager, but he really made a family-like atmosphere and brought this team together," Safford said from his prime vantage point on Boylston.

Bob Gardner traveled up from Newtown, Connecticut, with his wife and their 17-year-old grandson, Andrew. They took in the spectacle from near Fenway.

"It's an incredible thing because the team itself reflects so many good things — redemption, pride, teamwork — especially at this point in our country's history," he said.

Andrew agreed, saying: "It's just a special team. I'll tell my kids about this team. My grandkids.

"I'll never forget this moment."